On February 6th, 2018 at 20:45 UTC (3:45 PM EST), SpaceX launched the first Falcon Heavy from Launch Complex 39A at Kennedy Space Center. The legs will then deploy as the boosters turn back to Earth, landing each softly on the ground.
SpaceX has managed an incredible feat alongside its historic Falcon Heavy first test launch today -- landing two of its boosters at once, nearly simultaneously, intact. Shane McGlaun - Apr 16, 2019, 8:15 am CDT.

The Falcon Heavy delivered the Arabsat-6A into a supersynchronous transfer orbit with 90,000 km (56,000 mi) apogee with an inclination of 23 degrees to the equator. SpaceX's second Falcon Heavy, the first using Block 5 stages, successfully boosted 6,465 kg Arabsat 6A into supersynchronous transfer orbit from Kennedy Space Center LC 39A on April 11, 2019.

The center core landed successfully on the drone ship Of Course I Still Love You after Falcon Heavy’s launch today, marking a historic first in SpaceX’s history.
Although third time unlucky as the centre stage enjoys an explosive landing.

In future launches, the center core just needs more ignition fluid to ensure it can relight its engines before landing. SpaceX Falcon Heavy center core stuck the landing before sliding into the abyss. The center core landed successfully on the drone ship Of Course I Still Love You after Falcon Heavy’s launch today, marking a historic first in SpaceX’s history. Less than three minutes later, center core B1055 hit the bullseye on drone ship Of Course I Still Love You, wrapping up the first successful landing of the critical Falcon Heavy booster. SpaceX successfully landed the center core of its Falcon Heavy rocket on a drone ship last week, but the vehicle accidentally fell into the ocean while in transit to the Florida coast. The 27 Merlin 1D engines on the 2 first stage boosters and core stage roared to life and with 5 million pounds of thrust, them rocket began its ascension toward space. The Falcon 9 first-stage landing tests were a series of controlled-descent flight tests conducted by SpaceX between 2013 and 2016.

During the flight, the twin side boosters flew back to Cape Canaveral Landing Zones 1 and 2 while the core stage landed successfully downrange on the converted barge "Of Course I Still Love You". In the Falcon Heavy’s debut, the center booster splashed down in the ocean. In future launches, the center core just needs more ignition fluid to ensure it can relight its engines before landing. 3. The Falcon Heavy first stage center core and boosters each carry landing legs, which will land each core safely on Earth after takeoff. The center boosters, however, have had a run of bad luck.

During Falcon Heavy's second flight, SpaceX pulled off its first center core landing -- but the booster eventually toppled into the sea because the droneship lacked adequate clamps for the Heavy core. After the side boosters separate, the center engine in each will burn to control the booster’s trajectory safely away from the rocket. Since 2017, the first stage of Falcon 9 missions has been routinely landed if the rocket performance allowed it, and if SpaceX chose to recover the stage..